Pack and Den Leader Roles

The Pack Committee and Cub Scout dens are led by dedicated volunteers.  These BSA Den Leaders, Assistant Den Leaders and Committee Members have all undergone leadership training and work with the cub scouts to ensure they can achieve their rank by the end of the Scout year.

If you’d like to take an active part in our pack or in a den, please read the page How can I volunteer?


Pack and Den Roles:

Pack 130 Committee

The Pack Committee is committed to the overall success of the Pack.   The main roll of the Committee is to ensure that the year round Pack program is planned and implemented.  The committee manages the Pack finances and makes necessary decisions on Pack administration like planning monthly activities and choosing a charity to support.

The committee plans events which will help the Den Leaders achieve rank advancement for their scouts.   The Committee consists of Den Leaders and scout parents who wish to serve the Pack in an administrative setting.  Committee members meet once a month to discuss and plan the logistics of upcoming Pack events.   Parents can participate in meetings even if they are not on the committee.


Tiger Cub Den Leader

It all starts with Leader Training 

 

The Tiger Cub Den Leader:

  • Carries out the pack program in the den.  This means that you agree to coordinate with the Pack.  It’s already integrated in the program and handbooks.  No extra work involved.  You just can’t be a rogue leader.
  • Complete training for your specific position. This can be done online.
  • Lead the den in its participation at the pack meeting. Ex: Your Tigers may have to learn about something and then share it with the Pack during one of our monthly meetings.  You would prepare your boys during a den meeting and then coach them during their simple presentation.
  • Serve as den host for family members at pack meetings.  All this means is that you would make the parents of your cub scouts feel welcome during the Pack meetings.
  • Work in harmony with other den leaders of the pack.  Again, no extra work here.  If there is another den that needs to visit a police station and you know a contact person at a local facility, you’d share that information, no?
  • Help the pack recruit new members.  We really try to do whatever we can to make scouting possible for any boy who shows interest in the program.
  • Coordinate shared leadership among Tiger Cub adult partners in the den.  Parents of Tiger cubs should not drop off their scout and then return to pick him up at the end of a den or pack meeting.  Tiger cub parents are strongly encouraged to participate.  This is to help you and the boys get the hang of scouting together.
  • Ensure that each Tiger Cub has the opportunity to be the host, planning and executing the den activities, rotating responsibilities each month. It will help to coordinate with parents who cannot attend every den meeting with their scout.  If you schedule activities and then ask parents to rotate their involvement and participation in those activities, you still get the help you need and the parents get the time they need to attend to other things.  We are all multi-tasking these days.
  • Keep accurate records of den dues, attendance and advancement. This is all easily done online now, using scouttrack.com
  • Encourage Tiger Cubs to earn advancements. Everything is explained in the handbook.  There is a lot of information online and help from other den leaders in the Pack.
  • Work with Tiger Cub parents in planning and executing the den activities. There is a “den meeting plan” designed to help you distribute the responsibilities (who will bring the snack, who will fold the flag, etc.)
  • Take part in the committee meetings and planning.  You do not have to attend all the committee meetings and/or you can ask parents to attend for your den.  This ensures that your needs are being met by the pack.
  • Set a good example for the Tiger Cubs and their families.
  • Support the policies of the BSA. We are an international group so we support the BSA in a very international kind of way.  We tend to be more flexible than, say, a cub scout pack in middle America.

Use the scouting resources section to help plan your den meetings.


Wolf and Bear Cub Scout Den Leaders

It all starts with Leader Training 

 

Wolf and Bear Den Leaders and Assistant Den Leaders:

  • Take lead in carrying out the BSA program in the den.
  • Complete training for this specific position. Report your training completion to the Pack Trainer.
  • Plan, prepare and conduct den meetings.
  • Lead the den in its participation at the Pack meetings or assign a parent representative.
  • Work in harmony with other den leaders of the Pack.
  • Help the Pack recruit new members.
  • Help train your den chief and guide him in working with the den.
  • Provide meaningful jobs for the denner and assistant denner. Rotate denners over the course of their advancement so each boy has a turn.
  • Keep accurate records of den dues, attendance and advancement.  Report progress or difficulties to appropriate committee chairperson for follow-up.
  • Encourage Cub Scouts to earn advancements.
  • Work with Cub Scout parents in helping plan and execute the den activities.
  • Set a good example for the Cub Scouts and their families.
  • Attend committee meetings when necessary or send an informed representative.
  • Support the policies of the BSA in an international setting.

Use the scouting resources section to help plan your den meetings.


Webelos Den Leader

It all starts with Leader Training 

 

Webelos Den Leaders and Assistant Den Leaders:

  • Take lead in carrying out the BSA program in your den.
  • Complete training for this specific position. Report your training completion to the Pack Trainer.
  • Plan, prepare and conduct den meetings.
  • Lead the den in its participation at the Pack meetings or assign a parent representative.
  • Work in harmony with other den leaders of the Pack.
  • Help the Pack recruit new members.
  • Help train your den chief and guide him in working with the den.
  • Provide meaningful jobs for the denner and assistant denner. Rotate denners over the course of their advancement so each boy has a turn.
  • Keep accurate records of den dues, attendance and advancement.  Report progress or difficulties to appropriate committee chairperson for follow-up.
  • Encourage Cub Scouts to earn advancements.
  • Work with Cub Scout parents in helping plan and execute the den activities.
  • Set a good example for the Cub Scouts and their families.
  • Attend committee meetings when necessary or send an informed representative.
  • Support the policies of the BSA in an international setting.

Use the scouting resources section to help plan your den meetings.


More Questions?

Visit the Cub Scouts Basics page, our FAQ, or email the pack.